Developing a new approach to floating offshore wind mooring design and analysis

San Sebastián, Spain: An innovative new method for estimating second order motions could change the way the floating offshore wind industry approaches mooring design. This is the key finding of a new paper co-authored by CoreMarine hydrodynamics expert Carlos Lopez-Pavon.

 The paper was published in Renewable Energy journal together with experts from the University of Sao Paolo and Univseristy of Madrid.  

Titled 'Slow-drift of a floating wind turbine: An assessment of frequency-domain methods based on model tests', the paper examines the correlation between model testing of these second order motions and numerical analysis methods.

Floating offshore wind case study analysis model

Floating offshore wind case study analysis model

Slow drift forces can cause significant loading to the mooring systems of a floating wind turbine. However, these forces are difficult to accurately estimate in numerical analysis software. This lack of accurate modelling results in a tendency among engineers to over-design mooring systems to reduce the risk of failure, resulting in unnecessary extra cost. 

Current modeling and analysis methods require significant computational power and time. In the paper, Lopez-Pavon and the team applied several different numerical analysis methods to hydrodynamic models to calculate slow drift forces. They found the appropriate application of these methods can estimate forces more efficiently and without significant loss of accuracy than current methods allow. 

This expertise allows CoreMarine to continue working at the cutting edge of mooring system design and analysis, offering our clients more efficient, robust engineering. 

Floating offshore wind case study model test

Floating offshore wind case study model test


CoreMarine has a growing focus on floating offshore wind turbines as the industry pushes further from land. Deep coastal waters around significant sections of the US, Japan and parts of Europe require floating solutions in order for offshore wind to be feasible. Successful full-scale prototypes have recently been tested in these markets. Exciting times!